Infrared photography

I got my hands on some Efke IR820 infrared film recently, and put it to good use at various locations around Bristol. See my geek blog for a discussion of metering and exposure in infrared photography, or just read on for the pictures. Foliage is rendered white, while open water and the sky are rendered almost black. 🙂

The first two shots are of the footbridge and the weir at Snuff Mills, Bristol.

This derelict building is in Oldbury Court Estate, but I don’t know what it is. Looks pretty cool with a wide-angle lens, though.

Once again, my favourite tree – this time as you’ve never seen it before: in infrared.

Using infrared has rendered these pond plants white, and the water black.

This is the view from Brandon Hill nature reserve, looking south over Bristol. Here, infrared photography demonstrates its ability to cut through haze/smog in a city and give crisp images on the horizon, several miles away.

This shot was taken on the dockside, and includes the SS Great Britain.

These apartments are also on the dockside.

3 Comments

  1. Jose L. Uribe
    March 8, 2013
    Reply

    nice work Jonathan, I just got my first roll of Efke 820 and am using a R72 filter by Hoya. Someone suggested ISO 25 on my camera and hand held light meter. Than set camera to light meter. Do you think this will be enough exposure? I was thinking of taking a shot at what meter suggested, than +1, +2 over the meter what do you think?

    • March 8, 2013
      Reply

      Hmm, an R72 filter lets through more light than the filter I’m using. In summer you could probably get away with ISO25, but there isn’t very much infrared in the sunlight at this time of year so you might need more exposure.

      The only way to be sure is to shoot a test roll and bracket your shots. Take good notes about your settings and how you metered it and after you develop the film you’ll know which is the best method, and can use that method for your second film.

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